The lackawanna cutoff

From here, the double-track Cutoff ran northwest before turning west, cutting through Roseville Tunneland razoring its way across rural northern New Jersey.

The lackawanna cutoff

At the time of its construction in the early 20th century, it was engineered for unprecedented speed and efficiency - no corners would be cut in the construction of this eleven-million dollar mainline route.

Fast Track

Instead, the route went north from Port Morris, New Jersey, and turned west near Roseville for an arrow-straight shot right into Pennsylvania.

Right from the onset, the entire Cutoff, with the exception of one curve at Slateford, was remarkably designed for 70mph operation! Only one curve, most likely the aforementioned curve at Slateford, exceeded two degrees of curvature.

The Lackawanna became known as a pioneer in the use of reinforced concrete for its structures - the many abandoned towers, stations and viaducts that still stand today are a great testament to that. The Lackawanna allowed for no grade crossings on their new route, using instead concrete culverts and archways for which roads, waterways, and other railroads were to pass.

Although the Lackawanna had their mind set on a route without tunnels, geographical conditions at Roseville dictated that the route would require more than a rock cut. Grades were not compromised because of valleys, however, requiring the construction of fills as large as feet high and three miles long the largest, the Pequest Fill, fits both of those characteristics.

To this day, the great Lackawanna Cutoff, or the New Jersey Cutoff, is considered to be an engineering marvel. At the time of its construction in the early 20th century, it was engineered for unprecedented speed and efficiency - no corners would be cut in the construction of this eleven-million dollar mainline route. The Lackawanna Cutoff Restoration Project began in Since then, approximately miles of new railroad track has been placed by New Jersey Transit between Port Morris and the site of a new. On a cold December day, Chuck Walsh stands on the old hulking railroad viaduct over the Delaware River at the Water Gap, remembering the time when they tore up the railroad tracks on the Lackawanna .

Remarkably, the entire While the last rails were pulled up in the mids, New Jersey Transit recently purchased the right of way with the hope of relieving congestion on Interstate 80, possibly extending service as far as Scranton. We sure hope to see it back in operation in the near future!

Below is a listing of key locations along the Cutoff. We tried to be consistent with our before and after theme, but "before" photographs of some of these locations would be extremely difficult to find, if not impossible.

One must keep in mind that no picture can capture the majesty and aura of the Great Lackawanna Cutoff. We suggest you take a trip out to Northwest New Jersey and see it for yourself!Port Morris Junction, near the southern tip of Lake Hopatcong, was the starting point for the Great Lackawanna Cutoff.

Its name is derived from the Morris Canal, which flowed downhill from Lake Hopatcong toward both the Hudson and Delaware Rivers. The Lackawanna Cutoff Restoration Project began in Since then, approximately miles of new railroad track has been placed by New Jersey Transit between Port Morris and the site of a new.

Eight new stations were supposed to be built along the former Lackawanna Cutoff, but construction has yet to begin on the first stop.

In Northern New Jersey, nearly every county is served by NJ TRANSIT commuter rail stations. Touring the Lackawanna Cutoff By Don Barnickel, Paula Williams.

The lackawanna cutoff

Considered by many to be the most scenic rail line in New Jersey, the Lackawanna Cut-Off was . Lackawanna Cut-Off - Part Larry Malski Interview In this segment, we have the four-part interview with Larry Malski, President of the Pennsylvania Northeast Regional Railroad Authority, in its entirety.

Lackawanna Cut-Off video series - Part Roadways Under and Over the Cut-Off. In this segment, you get to ride "shot gun" in a guided tour along the roads between Port Morris, NJ and Slateford Junction, PA--a real time journey of almost two hours over 54 miles of roadways--to see all the public crossings (bridges, underpasses, and proposed grade crossings) on the mile line.

Lackawanna Cut-Off - Wikipedia