An analysis of the many ways of communicating in form of body language

Your facial expressions, gestures, posture, tone of voice, and level of eye contact are powerful communication tools. By improving how you understand and use nonverbal communication, you can express what you really mean, connect better with others, and build stronger, more rewarding relationships.

An analysis of the many ways of communicating in form of body language

Oculesics Oculesics, a subcategory of body language, is the study of eye movement, eye behavior, gaze, and eye-related nonverbal communication.

As a social or behavioral science, oculesics is a form of nonverbal communication focusing on deriving meaning from eye behavior. For example, in traditional Anglo-Saxon culture, avoiding eye contact usually portrays a lack of confidence, certainty, or truthfulness. Haptic communication Haptics, a subcategory of Body Language, is the study of touching and how it is used in communication.

Touching can be used to sooth, for amusement during play, to flirt, to express power and maintain bonds between people, such as with baby and mother. Touching can carry distinct emotions and also show the intensity of those emotions. Touch absent of other cues can signal anger, fear, disgust, love, gratitude and sympathy depending on the length and type of touching that is performed.

Many factors also contribute to the meaning of touching such as the length of the touch and location on the body in which the touching takes place. Research has also shown that people can accurately decode distinct emotions by merely watching others communicate via touch. Touching stresses how special the message is that is being sent by the initiator.

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For example, Jones and Yarbrough explained that strategic touching is a series of touching usually with an ulterior or hidden motive thus making them seem to be using touch as a game to get someone to do something for them.

The amount of touching that occurs within a culture is also culturally dependent. Proxemics Diagram of Edward T.

These clues can be either intentional or unintentional. Translating Body Language Following are some examples of body language, and what each example communicates to other people:
What Is Body Language?
Using Body Language Body language - basics and introduction Body language is a powerful concept which successful people tend to understand well. The study and theory of body language has become popular in recent years because psychologists have been able to understand what we 'say' through our bodily gestures and facial expressions, so as to translate our body language, revealing its underlying feelings and attitudes.
Language & Communication - Journal - Elsevier The investigation of language and its communicational functions is treated as a concern shared in common by those working in applied linguistics, child development, cultural studies Read more This journal is unique in that it provides a forum devoted to the interdisciplinary study of language and communication.
Body Language - rutadeltambor.com But sending across the right message with the right attitude is termed as effective communication. Most of the times, lack of proper communication skills will tend to send cross the wrong message resulting in bad communication.

Introduced by Edward T. Hall inproxemics is the study of measurable distances between people as they interact with one another. Hall also came up with four distinct zones in which most men operate: For example, when people talk they like to face each other.

If forced to sit side by side, their body language will try to compensate for this lack of eye-to-eye contact by leaning in shoulder-to-shoulder.

Hall suggested that "physical contact between two people They often greet one another by kissing on the cheeks. North Americanson the other hand, prefer to shake hands.

While they have made some physical contact with the shaking of the hand, they still maintain a certain amount of physical space between the other person.

The manner in which something is said can affect how it should be interpreted.

An analysis of the many ways of communicating in form of body language

Shouting, smiling, irony and so on may add a layer of meaning which is neither pure body language nor speech. Broadly, the theories can be categorized into two models: Where Darwin notes similarity in expression among animals and humans, the Cultural Equivalence Model notes similarity in expression across cultures in humans, even though they may be completely different.

One of the strongest pieces of evidence that supports this model was a study conducted by Ekman and Friesenwhere members of a preliterate tribe in Papua New Guinea reliably recognized the facial expressions of individuals from the United States.

Culturally isolated and with no exposure to US media, there was no possibility of cross-cultural transmission to the Papuan tribesmen. Tracy and Robins concluded that the expression of pride includes an expanded posture of the body with the head tilted back, with a low-intensity face and a non-Duchenne smile raising the corner of the mouth.

The expression of shame includes the hiding of the face, either by turning it down or covering it with the hands. Despite that, there have been certain areas where the conscious harnessing of body language - both in action and comprehension - have been useful.

The use of body language has also seen an increase in application and use commercially, with large volumes of books and guides published designed to teach people how to be conscious of body language, and how to use it to benefit them in certain scenarios.

Body language has seen application in instructional teaching in areas such as second-language acquisition [36] and also to enhance the teaching of subjects like mathematics.Popular books included Body Language (Fast, ), which focused on how to use nonverbal communication to attract other people, and How to Read a Person Like a Book (Nierenberg & Calero, ) which examined nonverbal behavior in negotiation situations.

book explains a form of ‘textual analysis’ whereby we attempt to at many levels, the ways of making sense of the world employed can be quite different: ‘The [to the Philippines] finds he is talking the same language, but not communicating at all he [sic] is in an entirely different world’ (ibid.: 1).

These differences. While the importance of body language in communications and management, etc., has become a popular interest and science in the last few decades, human beings have relied on body language instinctively in many ways for many thousands of years.

Smiling is perhaps one of the greatest body language signals, but smiles can also be interpreted in many ways. A smile may be genuine, or it may be used to express false happiness, sarcasm, or even cynicism.

Kinesic communication is communicating by body movement and is perhaps the most well-known non-verbal form of communication, although it is not the only way to talk with others without words. Body posture.

Nonverbal Communication Improving Your Nonverbal Skills and Reading Body Language. It's well known that good communication is the foundation of any successful relationship, be it personal or professional.

Nonverbal Communication: Reading Body Language and Improving Your Nonverbal Skills