An analysis of stratification in society

Simply put, social stratification is the allocation of individuals and groups according to various social hierarchies of differing power, status, or prestige. Although divisions are often based on gender, religion, or race and ethnicity, the present entry focuses largely on socioeconomic inequalities, for the most part leaving other forms of social inequality to other entries. In this regard, social stratification is found in every society, even if it takes on slightly different forms.

An analysis of stratification in society

What do we mean by social inequality? How can we conceive of and talk about social inequality in ways that are general enough to apply across the range of relevant phenomena, consistent enough to minimize conceptual ambiguities, and precise enough to be analytically effective?

People are unequal in every conceivable way in endless circumstances, both immediate and enduring, by both objective criteria and subjective experience. So, what counts as social inequality?

Can we characterize it in ways that let us confidently and impartially assess when there is more or less of it? Analytical Task Analytical task: What is social inequality? We often think that the meaning of social inequality is self-evident or easy.

Perhaps it is when we focus on extreme versions of the more obvious forms of social inequality, such as the rich compared to the poor. We want to begin by looking a little deeper into our conceptualization of social inequalities.

Choose two kinds of inequality.

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For each of these two kinds of inequality, consider an example showing a high degree of inequality and another showing equality or a minimal amount of inequality. For example, if we used political inequality as one kind, we might select one highly authoritarian nation and one highly democratic one, or we might compare two unions or two professional organizations.

Here we are simply trying to conceive a simple 2 x 2 table, showing two kinds of inequality and two levels of inequality for each kind. This is the simplest design for doing social analyses, whether that analysis is empirical or theoretical.

It is fine to use standard, commonly discussed kinds of inequality, but being original and creative about kinds of inequality to consider is also good. Describe briefly how the relevant groups are unequal for each type.

Do not worry about why such inequality exists. For now, we are concerned with what we mean by inequality, not what causes it.

Try to specify the crucial experiences, opportunities, or other circumstances that distinguish the beneficiaries of the inequality from those who are disadvantaged.

Consider also the relationships between the disadvantaged and advantaged, both direct and indirect. The idea of "indirect relationships" refers to ways that the advantaged or disadvantaged influence the circumstances or actions of those who are differently situated without direct interaction, e.

In short, for each of the two types of inequality, what induces us to call one example high inequality and another low? After working through the questions above, try to complete a definition sentence beginning "In general, social inequality exists when The implicit strategy is compare what social inequality means for the two chosen examples, then to try to identify the common conditions that make them and other forms all merit being called "social inequality" distinguished from the characteristics specific to certain types of inequality or concrete historical and cultural conditions.

To do this involves not only the empirical comparison, but the appropriate conceptual abstraction. For the ambitious to develop a deeper grasp Here are some other issues that you might integrate into your initial assessment of inequalities Vantage points. Might some people scholars, political actors, others disagree that any of the components you identify should really be considered inequality?

The goal here is to think through the reasons that people disagree about what should be called inequality? Try to figure out how we might measure the amount of inequality.Apr 22,  · is the trend towards social stratification, the system by which society organizes itself into a hierarchy.

In some cultures this is manifest in the form of a caste system in which people who are in poverty have little to no chance of escaping it. Social stratification is a process by which a society is divided into different layers, or strata, based on factors like level of education, occupation, income, and wealth.

People who live within the same strata are members of the same social class. Broadly defined, social stratification is an important part of many areas of study in sociology, but it also constitutes a distinct field on its own. Simply put, social stratification is the allocation of individuals and groups according to various social hierarchies of differing power, status, or.

Nikki Fredericks SOC April 9, Professor Bacaneri Social Stratification Analysis Part One: Social stratification is the societal organizational system by which individuals know their status in society.

An analysis of stratification in society

The system ranks people by their wealth, power, and ascribed status, therefore creating a social hierarchy. The four main systems of stratification that have existed throughout history %(4). The Functionalist View of Stratification: 1.

Social stratification - Wikipedia

Main principles of structural functionalism: a. Societies are complex systems of interrelated and interdependent parts, and each part of a society significantly influences the others.

- Social Stratification in 'Manifesto of the Communist Party' by Karl Marx and Max Weber's 'Class, Status and Party' Social stratification is the ranking of members of society in a way that some of its members are regarded as superior and others as inferior.

An analysis of stratification in society
SparkNotes: Social Stratification and Inequality: Theories of Stratification